Posts Tagged ‘1099s’

2017 Mailbag #2: The Case of the Deliberately Wrong 1099

Sunday, January 29th, 2017

Our second mailbag post deals with an issue I’ve reported on before: an incorrect information return. Once again, there’s a twist.

In 2015 I did some consulting for them and was paid $10,000; I received a 2015 Form 1099-MISC that correctly noted the income. I just received a 1099-MISC from them for 2016; however, I didn’t do any work for them in 2016. I called them and there response to my asking them to correct the error was “no.” What should I do?

The advice I gave before still applies:

But what if he refuses [to correct the 1099? Here, practicality must be used. Let’s say the total of your gross receipts is $32,000, and the total of your 1099-MISCs (and 1099-Ks) is $29,000. I’d likely just enter the 1099-MISC as received, and lower the “other” gross receipts by the extra $3000. (IRS instructions on information returns state to use the actual number. The problem is that the automated underreporting (AUR) unit will almost certainly send you a notice if you use the wrong number.)

Unfortunately, my correspondent’s total of her correct 1099s exactly equals her gross receipts so this strategy won’t work. I think there are two things she should do. First, send a letter (via certified mail) to the issuer of the incorrect 1099 explaining the situation and requesting that they issue a corrected 1099. Make sure you keep a copy of the return receipt (or tracking).

Second, consider including the 1099 on your tax return and then subtracting out the income (as a “return and allowance”). The IRS suggests (in this situation) that you subtract it out within gross receipts; the problem with that is that you’re almost certain to get an AUR notice. This method is less likely to generate an IRS notice, and your income is still being accurately reported.

What if you’re unlucky enough to get an IRS notice or be audited on this issue? Most of the time the burden of proof is on you, not the IRS; however, with information returns the burden of proof is on the IRS. The only evidence of my correspondent earning this “income” is the Form 1099-MISC. She has a separate bank account for her business; her bank deposits in 2016 exactly equal her gross receipts. Everything backs her story.

Congress changed the law on when 1099s for nonemployee compensation (independent contractors); those 1099s must now be filed by Tuesday, January 31st. One unforeseen consequence for tax professionals (and for recipients of 1099s) is that there will be more issues with incorrect 1099s this year. Hopefully the IRS’s performance on dealing with corrected 1099s will improve. If not, we’ll be dealing with a score of IRS notices on this issue next year.

On 1099 Due Dates in 2017

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

You may have heard that Form 1099-MISC’s must be filed earlier next year. That’s true, but it only impacts some of the 1099s. Let’s look at the IRS instructions:

New filing date. Public Law 114-113, Division Q, section 201, requires Form 1099-MISC to be filed on or before January 31, 2017, when you are reporting nonemployee compensation payments in box 7. Otherwise, file by February 28, 2017, if you file on paper, or by March 31, 2017, if you file electronically. The due dates for furnishing payee statements remain the same.

What this means is that only 1099-MISC’s for independent contractors (nonemployee compensation) must be filed by January 31st, whether you file by paper or electronically. All other information returns, including 1099-MISC’s reporting “Other Income,” will have the same deadlines as this past year: paper returns on or before February 28th, and electronic on or before March 31st.

I’m certain there will be confusion this coming year over the deadline. Of course, there’s no penalty for filing all your information returns by January 31st (whether required or not).

1099 Time for 2016

Sunday, January 10th, 2016

It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns. These are the Form 1099s that are sent to to vendors when required. Let’s look first at who does not have to receive 1099s:

  • Corporations (except attorneys)
  • Entities you purchased tangible goods from
  • Entities you purchased less than $600 from (except royalties; the limit there is $10)
  • Where you would normally have to send a 1099 but you made payment by a credit or debit card

Otherwise, you need to send a Form 1099-MISC to the vendor. The best way to check whether or not you need to send a 1099 to a vendor is to know this before you pay a vendor’s invoice. I tell my clients that they should have each vendor complete a Form W-9 before they pay the vendor. You can then enter the vendor’s taxpayer identification number into your accounting software (along with whether or not the vendor is exempt from 1099 reporting) on an ongoing basis.

Remember that besides the 1099 sent to the vendor, a copy goes to the IRS. If you file by paper, you likely do not have to file with your state tax agency (that’s definitely the case in California). However, if you file 1099s electronically with the IRS you most likely will also need to file them electronically with your state tax agency (again, that’s definitely the case in California). It’s a case where paper filing might be easier than electronic filing.

If you wish to file paper 1099s, you must order the forms from the IRS. The forms cannot be downloaded off the Internet. Make sure you also order Form 1096 from the IRS. This is a cover page used when submitting information returns (such as 1099s) to the IRS.

Note also that sole proprietors fall under the same rules for sending out 1099s. Let’s say you’re a professional gambler, and you have a poker coach that you paid $650 to last year. You must send him or her a Form 1099-MISC. Poker players who “swap” shares or have backers also fall under the 1099 filing requirement.

Finally, there are strict deadlines with information returns. Here are the deadlines for 2014 information returns:

  • Monday, February 1st: Deadline for mailing most 1099s to recipients;
  • Monday, February 29th: Deadline for filing paper 1099s with the IRS (postmark deadline); and
  • Thursday, March 31st: Deadline for filing 1099s electronically with the IRS.

Remember, if you are going to mail 1099s to the IRS send them certified mail, return receipt requested so that you have proof of the filing.

The Tax Court Looks for $1,410 in Dividends

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Today I generated my first 1099s for clients. The Tax Court looked at a case where the petitioners said they didn’t receive three $470 dividends. The issuer said they sent the checks and a Form 1099-DIV. Who was right?

In the case of information returns, the burden of proof can shift to the IRS.

If a taxpayer asserts a reasonable dispute with respect to any item of income reported on a third-party information return and the taxpayer has fully cooperated with the Secretary, the Secretary has the burden of producing reasonable and probative information concerning that deficiency in addition to such information return.

But the Court never looked at that as it based its decision on “the preponderance of the evidence.”

The only evidence that the IRS had was a letter from Computerserve (the registered agent for BNSF, the company that might or might not have issued the dividends) that said they were issued and that a 1099-DIV was sent to the petitioner.

Petitioner husband has made numerous unsuccessful attempts in recent years to contact Computershare and Wells Fargo regarding various matters relating to his BNSF stockholdings, including payment of the disputed dividends…

Petitioner husband testified that petitioners did not receive the disputed dividend payments in 2009 or a Form 1099-DIV reporting those payments and that he does not recall having negotiated any checks. His testimony included details regarding the acquisition of BNSF by Berkshire Hathaway and his persistent but unsuccessful attempts to make inquires with Computerserve and Wells Fargo about the disputed dividend payments. He called the phone number provided in the February 28, 2014, letter, but was unable to speak to anyone regarding that
letter…

Petitioner husband has devoted a substantial amount of time to contest the relatively small amount of tax liability at issue here, and he testified consistently, clearly, and with considerable conviction in explaining the negative–that he did not receive the disputed dividend payments. He has persuaded us that he did not receive the disputed dividend payments in 2009.

I suspect that the petitioner had documentation of his phone calls to Computerserve and Wells Fargo. If you do ever find yourself in such a situation, keep good records of your attempts to obtain information.

In any case, this case does show that when there’s an incorrect information return (a 1099) it is possible to dispute it and win. It would have been a lot easier for the petitioners if they could have reached someone at Computerserve or Wells Fargo and explain their situation but we have to treat life as it is, not as we want it to be.

Case: Ebert v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo 2015-5

1099 Time (2015 Version)

Saturday, January 3rd, 2015

As we start 2015, we’re running some repeats of important issues.

It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns. These are the Form 1099s that are sent to to vendors when required. Let’s look first at who does not have to receive 1099s:

  • Corporations (except attorneys)
  • Entities you purchased tangible goods from
  • Entities you purchased less than $600 from (except royalties; the limit there is $10)

Otherwise, you need to send a Form 1099-MISC to the vendor. The best way to check whether or not you need to send a 1099 to a vendor is to know this before you pay a vendor’s invoice. I tell my clients that they should have each vendor complete a Form W-9 before they pay the vendor. You can then enter the vendor’s taxpayer identification number into your accounting software (along with whether or not the vendor is exempt from 1099 reporting) on an ongoing basis.

Remember that besides the 1099 sent to the vendor, a copy goes to the IRS. If you file by paper, you likely do not have to file with your state tax agency (that’s definitely the case in California). However, if you file 1099s electronically with the IRS you most likely will also need to file them electronically with your state tax agency (again, that’s definitely the case in California). It’s a case where paper filing might be easier than electronic filing.

If you wish to file paper 1099s, you must order the forms from the IRS. The forms cannot be downloaded off the Internet. Make sure you also order Form 1096 from the IRS. This is a cover page used when submitting information returns (such as 1099s) to the IRS.

Note also that sole proprietors fall under the same rules for sending out 1099s. Let’s say you’re a professional gambler, and you have a poker coach that you paid $650 to last year. You must send him or her a Form 1099-MISC. Poker players who “swap” shares or have backers also fall under the 1099 filing requirement.

Finally, there are strict deadlines with information returns.  Here are the deadlines for 2014 information returns:

  • Monday, February 2nd: Deadline for mailing most 1099s to recipients;
  • Monday, March 2nd: Deadline for filing paper 1099s with the IRS (postmark deadline); and
  • Tuesday, March 31st: Deadline for filing 1099s electronically with the IRS.

Remember, if you are going to mail 1099s to the IRS send them certified mail, return receipt requested so that you have proof of the filing.

It’s Only $1,300; Do You Really Have To Send Me the 1099?

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

The deadline for mailing 1099s to recipients is this coming Friday, January 31st. That’s a postmark deadline. If you mail a 1099 on Friday and it takes two weeks to get to the recipient, that’s not a problem. (Well, it is a problem for the postal service, but not the sender.)

One of my clients sent a Form W-9 to an individual; that individual received $1,300 from my client so a 1099-MISC needs to be sent. The individual responded, “It’s not much money–it’s only $1,300. Can’t you just skip sending the 1099?” As I told my client, the answer should be no.

A few years ago the IRS wised up and added questions on business forms, such as Schedule C:

You now have to answer a question whether or not you made any payments in 2013 that would require you to file a 1099 (Question I); Question J asks, “If ‘Yes,’ did you or will you file required Forms 1099?” It’s pretty obvious that my client needs to check the “yes” box to Question I. Checking “no” on Question J after checking “yes” on Question I is an excellent way of asking the IRS, “Can you please audit me?”

I suspect the recipient would prefer that $1,300 be under-the-table. My client and I agree that we’re going to obey the law and issue the 1099. (He did receive the completed Form W-9.) As a reminder, if someone refuses to complete a Form W-9 you must begin backup withholding. I also suspect that reminding the recipient of that detail influenced his decision to complete the Form W-9.

1099 Time

Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

As we finish the first week of January, we’re running some repeats of important issues.

It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns. These are the Form 1099s that are sent to to vendors when required. Let’s look first at who does not have to receive 1099s:

  • Corporations (except attorneys)
  • Entities you purchased tangible goods from
  • Entities you purchased less than $600 from (except royalties; the limit there is $10)

Otherwise, you need to send a Form 1099-MISC to the vendor. The best way to check whether or not you need to send a 1099 to a vendor is to know this before you pay a vendor’s invoice. I tell my clients that they should have each vendor complete a Form W-9 before they pay the vendor. You can then enter the vendor’s taxpayer identification number into your computer (along with whether or not the vendor is exempt from 1099 reporting) on an ongoing basis.

Remember that besides the 1099 sent to the vendor, a copy goes to the IRS. If you file by paper, you likely do not have to file with your state tax agency (that’s definitely the case in California). However, if you file 1099s electronically with the IRS you most likely will also need to file them electronically with your state tax agency (again, that’s definitely the case in California). It’s a case where paper filing is easier than electronic filing.

Note also that sole proprietors fall under the same rules for sending out 1099s. Let’s say you’re a professional gambler, and you have a poker coach that you paid $650 to last year. You must send him or her a Form 1099-MISC. Poker players who “swap” shares or have backers also fall under the 1099 filing requirement.

When a W-2G (or Other Information Return) Is Wrong

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Let’s say you’re self-employed, and you get a 1099-MISC from a customer. He notes he paid you $1,200. However, he really paid you $900. What do you do?

First, you contact the customer and attempt for him to correct the error. Hopefully, you can show him a copy of your invoice(s) or other documentation, and he or she will issue a corrected 1099-MISC.

But what if he refuses? Here, practicality must be used. Let’s say the total of your gross receipts is $32,000, and the total of your 1099-MISCs (and 1099-Ks) is $29,000. I’d likely just enter the 1099-MISC as received, and lower the “other” gross receipts by the extra $300. (IRS instructions on information returns state to use the actual number. The problem is that the automated underreporting (AUR) unit will almost certainly send you a notice if you use the wrong number.)

Earlier this week I was faced with a different situation. My client, an amateur gambler from Indiana, entered a poker tournament in Iowa. The tournament had a $300 buy-in, and my client cashed for $2,300. Under federal law, no W-2G would be issued because the amount of his win, $2,000, is less than the threshold for issuing a W-2G in a poker tournament ($5,000). However, under Iowa law withholding on nonresident’s winnings begin at gross winnings of $1,200 (at a rate of 5%). My client received a W-2G for $2,300, not $2,000. What should be done? (My client has excellent records, including the tournament buy-in receipt.)

The amount of the win is $2,000, not $2,300. Indiana does not allow gambling losses to be deducted on their state income tax returns, so this is an issue for my client. (This can be an issue for individuals on federal returns, too. Gambling losses are an itemized deduction, so they don’t impact Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). Many tax items are tied to AGI, such as being able to contribute to a Roth IRA.) However, if I enter $2,000 as the amount won for that W-2G, the IRS’s automated underreporting unit will flag the return.

The solution is to enter the W-2G as it was received, and then subtract out the $300 buy-in just below this. I included an explanation: “Buy-in for W-2G winnings.” Should the IRS, Iowa, or Indiana flag the return, we can respond with a perfect paper trail showing that what we did is to put the income my client really earned on the tax return. Given that this is a fundamental principle of US taxation, all should be well.

The same process can be used for other information returns that are erroneous: Enter the “wrong” numbers, and modify them with an explanation. Do realize that there is a chance that the AUR unit may ask for proof. This is yet another reason why the solution to many tax issues is to document, document, document.

1099 Repeal?

Friday, July 30th, 2010

Before I head out the door, I just saw a short article that a repeal of the new requirement on issuance of 1099s (part of the health care fiasco) was introduced by Democrats today. The measure was an amendment to a bill on health care benefits on 9/11 respondents. The overall measure failed on a procedural vote (it needed a two-thirds vote to pass).

However, the fact that Democrats introduced the measure indicates that it is very likely that the burdensome 1099 requirement will be repealed before the implementation date (2012).

1099 Time

Sunday, January 3rd, 2010

It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns. These are the Form 1099s that are sent to to vendors when required. Let’s look first at who does not have to receive 1099s:

  • Corporations (except attorneys)
  • Entities you purchased tangible goods from
  • Entities you purchased less than $600 from (except royalties; the limit there is $10)

Otherwise, you need to send a Form 1099-MISC to the vendor. The best way to check whether or not you need to send a 1099 to a vendor is to know this before you pay a vendor’s invoice. I tell my clients that they should have each vendor complete a Form W-9 before they pay the vendor. You can then enter the vendor’s taxpayer identification number into your computer (along with whether or not the vendor is exempt from 1099 reporting) on an ongoing basis.

Remember that besides the 1099 sent to the vendor, a copy goes to the IRS. If you file by paper, you likely do not have to file with your state tax agency (that’s definitely the case in California). However, if you file 1099s electronically with the IRS you most likely will also need to file them electronically with your state tax agency (again, that’s definitely the case in California). It’s a case where paper filing is easier than electronic filing.

We should all probably enjoy this year and next year vis-a-vis 1099s. It looks like the corporate exemption for 1099s will end in the near future, and that means more paperwork for businesses and more work for tax professionals.