The 2014 State Business Tax Climate Index: Bring Me the Usual Suspects

The Tax Foundation released its 2014 State Business Tax Climate Index. In what will shock few readers of this blog, the usual suspects remain at both the top and bottom of the list.

First, let’s look at the top states–the best for business:

1. Wyoming
2. South Dakota
3. Nevada
4. Alaska
5. Florida
6. Washington
7. Montana
8. New Hampshire
9. Utah
10. Indiana

What do these states share? Generally, low taxes (and in the case of some of these states, no income tax). But as the Tax Foundation noted, “But this does not mean that a state cannot rank in the top ten while still levying all the major taxes. Indiana, which ousted Texas from the top ten this year, and Utah have all the major tax types, but levy them with low rates on broad bases.”

What happens when you have high taxes, complex taxes, and non-neutral taxes? You end up in the bottom ten:

41. Maryland
42. Connecticut
43. Wisconsin
44. North Carolina
45. Vermont
46. Rhode Island
47. Minnesota
48. California
49. New Jersey
50. New York

Let’s take my home state, Nevada, and compare it with California (my old state) to see why each ranks where they do. The Tax Foundation looked at five taxes: Corporate Tax, Individual Income Tax, Sales Tax, Unemployment Insurance Tax, and Property Tax.

Nevada doesn’t have a corporate tax or an individual income tax, so the state is tied at number one for both. California ranks dead last on the individual income tax. Not only does the Bronze Golden State have the highest state tax rate, there are numerous conformity issues (with federal taxes), and a tax bureaucracy that is hard to work with. California is below average for the corporate tax. This isn’t because California is that good; rather, there are states that are far worse.

Nevada and California rank 40th and 41st respectively on sales tax. Both states have complex systems with rates that vary in different districts. Additionally, both states have fairly high sales tax rates. California significantly outranks Nevada on Unemployment Insurance Tax. Nevada’s tax rate is one of the highest; California’s is relatively low with conformity on the maximum income base for this tax ($7,000). Nevada slightly outranks California on property tax (9th versus 14th). California’s low ranking is because of limits from Proposition 13. It’s something that gives certainty and is probably the third rail of California politics.

What most observers forget is the importance of the individual income tax. Most businesses pay tax through individual income taxes, not corporate taxes. S Corporations, LLCs, LLPs, general and limited partnerships, and sole proprietorships are flow-through entities that are taxed on the individual level. States that provide low rates on individual income taxes generally do better for businesses. While California is known for its entrepreneurs (think Silicon Valley), its tax climate discourages such ventures.

And for those who think that taxes don’t matter, I’m in Nevada as a result of taxes and California’s miserable business climate. Nissan moved its headquarters from California to Tennessee, and taxes were a big factor. For both small and large businesses (and everyone in between), these issues count. The Tax Foundation’s full study is well worth your perusal.

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One Response to “The 2014 State Business Tax Climate Index: Bring Me the Usual Suspects”

  1. [...] Fox, The 2014 State Business Tax Climate Index: Bring Me the Usual Suspects.  ”And for those who think that taxes don’t matter, I’m in Nevada as a result of taxes [...]

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