Kiplinger’s Tax-Friendly and Least Tax-Friendly States: Bring Me (Mostly) the Usual Suspects

Kiplinger has come out with their list of most tax-friendly and least tax-friendly states. There aren’t many surprises on the list, and readers of this blog definitely won’t be shocked with the least friendly state. The most friendly state was a little different. Do note that Kiplinger looked at all the taxes in a state, not just income tax.

Most Tax-Friendly States:
1. Delaware
2. Wyoming
3. Alaska
4. Louisiana
5. Alabama
6. Mississippi
7. Arizona
8. New Mexico
9. Nevada
10. South Carolina

Why Delaware? It has a relatively low income tax, no sales tax, low property taxes, and low a excise tax on alcohol. My state, Nevada, is noted for its non-existent income tax.

Here is Kiplinger’s least tax-friendly states:

1. California
2. Connecticut
3. New Jersey
4. Hawaii
5. New York
6. Rhode Island
7. Vermont
8. Maine
9. Minnesota
10. Illinois

Why California?

If you’re moving to the Golden State, plan to take short showers (to conserve water) and to pay the highest state income tax rates in the U.S. Worse, capital gains are taxed as regular income.

California also has the highest statewide sales tax, at 7.5% (it’s scheduled to drop to 7.3% at the end of 2016). The average state and local combined rate is 8.4%; in some cities, the combined rate is as high as 10%.

There’s actually more bad news about California’s taxes noted in the short article.

Kiplinger also has a tax map so you can find your state and whether it is tax-friendly or not.

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One Response to “Kiplinger’s Tax-Friendly and Least Tax-Friendly States: Bring Me (Mostly) the Usual Suspects”

  1. […] Fox, Kiplinger’s Tax-Friendly and Least Tax-Friendly States: Bring Me (Mostly) the Usual Suspects. Iowa’s somewhere in the middle. Delaware is rated best, California […]

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