Dead Men Tell No Tales, Even When They’re Supposed To

For tax practitioners, the IRS’s e-Services suite of applications is extraordinarily useful. When a client give us the appropriate authorization we’re able to pull transcripts from the IRS’s computer system. This helps us file appropriate tax returns and it helps the IRS because we can file the returns.

Early last week I attempted to run a transcript for a deceased individual. I was authorized by the Executor of the estate and filed all appropriate paperwork with the IRS. When I attempted to obtain a transcript I was directed to call the IRS’s Practitioner Priority Service rather than just being able to print the transcript. It turns out the IRS has ‘locked’ about 64 million tax returns of deceased individuals as a security measure.

Neither PPS nor the IRS’s e-Services help desk was aware of this change. The news came from a fellow Enrolled Agent who was told about this from his IRS Liaison. And while I understand why the IRS has done this their implementation leaves something to be desired.

Consider John Smith, a widower. Mr. Smith has given a CPA authority (via a Tax Information Authorization) for tax years 2014-2016. Mr. Smith passes away on August 1, 2017. His authority passes away with him, and it makes sense that the IRS doesn’t allow that CPA to run transcripts. However, Mr. Smith’s Executor gives me authority. (This is done by having the Executor sign a new Tax Information Authorization and the Executor must give the IRS proof of his authority through completing Form 56.) So why must I call PPS to obtain the transcripts? It’s not as if PPS is going to do anything different than the automated checking that is already done through e-Services.

But that’s the good case. Now consider Mary Doe. Her husband John Doe passed away in 2006 (that’s 11 years ago). Ms. Doe has been filing as single for a decade. Ms. Doe signed a Power of Attorney in 2016 as she’s dealing with an IRS automated underreporting notice issue. I needed to run a 2015 transcript to make sure the IRS has appropriately applied a payment. I was unable to do that through e-Services because her account has now been linked to her late husband. (I was able to run these transcripts in the past through e-Services.) This is a true story (other than the names).

PPS duly ordered the transcript for me but I was in for a surprise when it came: It was for her late husband’s tax account. Unless there’s something about the great beyond that I don’t know about he is no longer too concerned with the IRS. I called PPS up and there is now no way for me to obtain an account transcript for Ms. Doe! According to PPS, once an account has been linked it cannot be unlinked! (PPS told me that the payment has been correctly applied. However, given that it was misapplied twice in the past I wish I could run that transcript.)

Come on, man! IRS, this is completely ridiculous. After the year of Mr. Doe’s passing there’s no reason for the two accounts to be linked. Additionally, there’s no reason tax professionals should have to call to obtain transcripts we’re authorized for. It would seem to me to be a simple programming fix: If the authorization is dated after the date of death (and it’s valid), allow the practitioner to just print the transcripts from e-Services.

Unfortunately, tax professionals now have to waste more time on the phone for no particularly good reason.

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