Selling Software to Cheat the Government Out of Strip Clubs’ Taxes Isn’t a Bright Idea

It’s one thing to sell accounting software such as QuickBooks. That product, when used properly, helps companies accurately report their income.

Theodore Kramer sold a very different software product. His Journal Sales Remover made income magically vanish from a company’s books. As the DOJ noted,

In 2001, the owner of two Detroit-area strip clubs requested that Kramer load the JSR program onto his clubs’ computer systems so that the club owner could report less income to the IRS. From about 2001 to about 2004, Kramer periodically visited the clubs to run the JSR program to remove a substantial amount of the clubs’ sales from their computers. The club owner then provided the reduced sales figures to his accountant. With Kramer’s assistance, the club owner understated his clubs’ gross receipts by more than $500,000.

Shock of shocks, a strip club owner wanted to cheat on his taxes. And more shocking is that the IRS would be looking at a strip club’s income (that was sarcasm, of course).

Joe Kristan has more.

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One Response to “Selling Software to Cheat the Government Out of Strip Clubs’ Taxes Isn’t a Bright Idea”

  1. […] appears that sales of the “Journal Sales Remover” may have been better than thought of. I wrote about this product in 2010; it wasn’t a bright idea then and it’s not one […]

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